Radical Living

During our time in Honduras we began thinking about how we could help the children and families we met. Around this time we were reading David Platt’s Radical. In Radical, Platt calls believers to abandon American dream. He challenges believers to care more about serving others than buying lots of stuff or climbing the corporate ladder of success. We decided that we wanted to be, as Platt, says, “a people who refuse to gorge our spiritual stomachs on the entertaining pleasures of this world, because we have chosen to find our satisfaction in the eternal treasure of His Word.”

We decided to create Simple Matters because we wanted to start focusing more on others and less on self. Instead of being overwhelmed with the problems in the world, instead of being overwhelmed with what it really means to live in reckless abandonment for the gospel of Jesus Christ, we decided that simple changes would lead to long-lasting life changes. We decided we could give what we have and invite others to do the same.

God has blessed us not so that we may keep His blessings to ourselves, but so that we can help our neighbors and the nations come to know Him.

From Radical:

“Clearly, God does not command or expect us to meet every need. But the logic that says, “I can’t do everything, so I won’t do anything” is straight from hell.”

“Anyone wanting to proclaim the glory of Christ to the ends of the earth must consider not only how to declare the gospel verbally but also how to demonstrate the gospel visibly in a world where so many are urgently hungry.”

“If our lives do not reflect radical compassion for the poor, there is reason to wonder if Christ is really in us at all.”

“Are we willing to ask God if he wants us to sell everything we have and give the money to the poor? Are we willing to ask and wait for an answer instead of providing one of our own or justifying our ideas of why he would never tell us to do this? This seems a bit radical, but isn’t it normal and expected when we follow a Master who said, “Any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple?”

“Why not begin operating under the idea that God has given us excess, not so that we could have more, but so we could give more? Now we’re getting radical.”